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Snowy weather doesn't stop UW-Madison graduates

Snowy weather doesn't stop UW-Madison graduates

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Slippery conditions and long, slow drives were all too common stories at this year's University of Wisconsin - Madison winter graduation ceremony.

"We actually drove up today. It was pretty slushy and slippery, we had to take our time," one graduate said.

With Madison getting over a half foot of snow, staff said they weren't expecting such a large turnout for the usually smaller ceremony. But it was something graduate Devin Schlapbach said no student or family would have missed.

"After you go to school for four or five years, you put a lot of time and effort into it," Schlapbach said. "Nothing is really going to stop anyone from seeing their kids graduate."

Another graduate concurred, acknowledging how important the day was for family.

Dozens watch anti-bullying film at library

More than 40 people showed up to watch the documentary "Bully" downtown at the Madison Central Library on West Mifflin Street Wednesday.

"Bully" is a powerful and provocative film that follows the lives of five kids who are bullied every day. Its message is that the culture of our schools is broken and needs to change.

The film resonated with many viewers, bringing some close to tears, who discussed the film after the 6:30 p.m. showing. The dialogue was moderated by News 3 Anchor Susan Siman as part of WISC-TV's year-long "Time for Kids Buddy Project" to fight bullying.

Eleven-year-old Terriana Brown said the movie hit close to home for her.  

""I might cry right now," Brown said. "It feels like it's me that is on the screen."

DPI announces school-funding numbers

DPI announces school-funding numbers

The Department of Public Instruction released school-funding numbers Tuesday, and 183 districts will see an increase in state aid. Another 239 districts, including the Madison Metropolitan School District, will see a decrease in state aid.

Total aid given to districts has increased by a total of $47.9 million from the last school year bringing the total school funding budget to $4.342 billion, according to a release.

Funding for Madison will drop 14.5 percent compared to last year. The district will get $49.9 million from the state, which is about $9 million less than last year.

Report: UW students better at paying student loans

Report: UW students better at paying student loans

University of Wisconsin-Madison students do a better job than most at repaying student loans, according to the U.S. Department of Education's federal student aid figures.

UW-Madison students had a 1.11 percent default rate on federal Perkins Loans in 2012 compared to the national average of about 11 percent.

Perkins Loans are normally for students with high financial need.

Pick Six: Badger hockey goalie Alex Rigsby

Pick Six: Badger hockey goalie Alex Rigsby

The Badger women's hockey team, off to a 2-0 start, are at Minnesota this weekend.

Goalie Alex Rigsby was named WCHA defensive player of the week. And she's the subject of News 3's Pick Six, a series in which we get to know prominent local athletes a little better.

Water Wagon pours H2O at area schools

Water Wagon pours H2O at area schools

As part of an effort to encourage healthy habits for kids, the city's "Water Wagon" will make stops at five Madison elementary schools in the next two weeks.

Madison Water Utility is taking its water unit to Chavez Elementary, Huegel Elementary, Van Hise Elementary and Marquette Elementary. The tour kicked off last week with a stop at Muir Elementary, the city said.

The Water Wagon tour is meant to promote healthy choices, like staying hydrated, as part of a challenge to students over two weeks to walk or bike to school, also called the Walk or Wheel Challenge.

QB Rodgers comes to UW for good cause

QB Rodgers comes to UW for good cause

Star power came together on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus to raise awareness about the Congo.

Emmanuelle Chriqui, an actress from the TV show Entourage, and Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers were at the Memorial Union Terrace on Monday night thanks to The Enough Project and UW?s student chapter of the Conflict Free Campus Initiative.

Their goal is to bring peace in Congo where blood diamonds help fund brutal wars and children are often kidnapped and trained as soldiers.

Rodgers spoke about how students can urge companies that make the electronics they use often, like cellphone, to use materials that do not come from conflict zones.

?We can say to those tech companies and those people, we want to live in a world where our electronics do not fund rape and war,? Rodgers said.

The Conflict Free Campus Initiative is currently on more than 150 college campuses across the country.