Our network

People

No refuse or recycling collection on Christmas, News Year's

No refuse or recycling collection on Christmas, News Year's

According to the city of Madison, there will be no refuse or recycling on Dec. 25 or Jan. 1 because of the Christmas and New Year's holidays. If your material is normally collected on Thursday, it will be collected on Friday, Dec. 26 and Friday, Jan. 2.

Residents should be sure to get material out to the curb by 7 a.m., as Street Division crews will be collecting in both the Thursday and Friday refuse districts on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2.

Because of the double collection, large item collection will be reduced. Residents are asked to hold large items until after the holidays if possible.

The Streets Division's offices and drop-off sites will also be closed on Dec. 25 and Jan. 1. They will conduct regular refuse and recycling collection on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve. Their offices will also be open on those dates.

For additional information, visit the Streets Division's web page.

Tree lighting event to benefit hospital's nursing, newborn care programs

A hospital will host a remembrance tree lighting ceremony to benefit its nursing program and newborn care department. 

St. Mary’s Lights of Love Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony will be held Sunday at 4 p.m. in the Gardens of St. Mary's on Brooks Street. 

The program offers LED lights for purchase to honor a loved one. Red lights serve as a living tribute and white lights honor the memory of a lost loved one. A third color, blue, is added this year to honor or remember those who served in the military.

Proceeds from the Lights of Love program benefit St. Mary’s patients, their families and the hospital's nursing program. The funds raised help support items that are essential for tiny newborns such as Bilirubin Lights and the Hearing Screening device, as well as nursing scholarships for employees and volunteers.

Fans face off for Paul Bunyan's axe

Fans face off for Paul Bunyan's axe

The battle for Paul Bunyan?s axe is a longstanding tradition between the Badgers and the Gophers, but fans came prepared to fight Saturday.

Despite the home-field advantage it wasn't just the Badgers fans that came out to support their team, Minnesota brought plenty of reinforcements too.

"We don't come here to watch losing football," Gophers fan Chris Harder said.

You can ask fans from either side of the playing field and they will tell you about the longest-running rivalry in Division 1 football.

"It's going to be a close game, but we are going to win. We will get Paul Bunyan's axe and we will win," Badgers fan Ann Powers said.

The Badgers have dominated the gophers for 10 straight wins, but Minnesota fans came to Camp Randall Saturday hoping to break the winning streak.

"We've taken a few beatings over the years, but hopefully this is the year it all changes," Gophers fan Andrew Lovelett said.

Organization takes on racial disparities in incarceration

Organization takes on racial disparities in incarceration

The Wisconsin Council on Children and Families' “Race to Equity” report indicates that Wisconsin, and particularly Dane County, may have the worst racial disparities in incarceration in the nation. MOSES, a Madison-based interfaith social justice organization, is working to fix that.

In fact, it may go even farther than that. Amy Pooler, a leader in MOSES, said, “Dane County has the worst racial disparities in incarceration rates of African American rates in the country, and that means in the world, because the U.S. already incarcerates more of its population than any other nation on Earth.”

Homeless look for places to store belongings through winter

Homeless look for places to store belongings through winter

Vicky Lewandowski has spent the majority of her nights since September sleeping at the City-County Building where she also keeps her belongings, but in a blink of an eye all she owned was gone.

"Your survival kicks in. Today was like a normal day and then all of a sudden we lost everything that helps us battle the elements. The first thing I was thinking is, 'How am I going to stay warm? Am I going to try to find shelter? Am I going to have to recover blankets?'" Lewandowski said.

Wednesday morning county employees removed two truckloads of homeless belongings left in front of the building Lewandowski calls home.

An ordinance allows Madison employees to throw away any items less than $50 in value if left abandoned. Anything worth more than $50 would be turned in to the city, where it would be held for 30 days to be reclaimed.

City to keep adding flouride to water supply

City to keep adding flouride to water supply

The Madison Water Utility Board said this week that it would continue to add fluoride to the city's drinking water.

The utility board voted at its meeting Tuesday night to keep its fluoride policy. The city's been adding fluoride to water to improve dental health for 68 years since the policy was adopted in 1946.

Madison Water Utility currently aims for a target fluoride concentration of 0.7 parts per million, as recommended by county, national and international health agencies.

In a news release Wednesday, the city of Madison said it took public comments on the policy Tuesday for about two hours before the vote.

The policy will be reviewed again in 2024.

RELATED: Utility to review adding fluoride to Madison water