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Interior Design Program Ranked Among Top 10 Nationally

Interior Design Program Ranked Among Top 10 Nationally

The undergraduate interior design program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Human Ecology has been ranked No. 10 out of 200 similar U.S. programs by Design Intelligence, a bi-monthly report published by the Design Futures Council.

The top 10 list included 15 institutions, with five tied with UW-Madison at No. 10.

Many of the nation's leading interior design institutions are at private, not public, institutions, making the UW-Madison's achievement remarkable, according to Wei Dong, Design Studies Department chair. The University of Cincinnati ranked first, followed by New York's Pratt Institute and the Savannah College of Art and Design.

Madison's Recycling Program To Expand In 2012

Madison's Recycling Program To Expand In 2012

The city of Madison will be expanding the list of materials that it will accept in its curbside recycling program beginning Jan. 1. The changes are possible because of a new recycling processing contract the city has signed with Pellitteri Waste Systems of Madison.

"We are very excited about our new recycling contract," Madison recycling coordinator George Dreckmann said in a news release. "In addition to expanding the list of materials that Madison residents can put in their green recycling carts, we were able to negotiate a lower fee for sorting and selling our material. This lower fee will save taxpayers $173,470 per year."

Madison residents will now be able to add the following material to their recycling carts;

Madison Property Taxes Are Put In Mail

Madison Property Taxes Are Put In Mail

The city portion of taxes on an average Madison home is increasing 3.7 percent. The total levy increase on the average home is 2.71 percent this year compared to nearly 6 percent in 2010.

Triangle Neighborhood Garden Is Home To Diverse Population Of Growers

Triangle Neighborhood Garden Is Home To Diverse Population Of Growers

Strawberries, herbs, melons, oh, my! These are just a few of the delights that grow in the Triangle Neighborhood Garden, off Park Street, near the Bayview Center.

The garden is unique, not just for its variety of produce, but for the people that tend to it. Residents from all walks of life work together, planting exotic and uncommon foods.

“It’s an interesting garden…because there’s so many different things planted,” said Sheri Harper, Manager for the Bayview Foundation, Inc.

Okra, kale, chard, and dill are available, as are berries, squash, melons, and a variety of peppers.

All area residents have easy access to the gardens; the paths are handicap accessible, and the entrance is just feet away from the Bayview Community Center, offering a friendly invitation to participants of all ages and backgrounds.

Firefighters Respond To More Than 31 Cooking Fires This Month

Firefighters Respond To More Than 31 Cooking Fires This Month

The latest cooking fire at an apartment on East Gorham Street on Tuesday night is part of a disturbing trend in October, which is Fire Prevention Month.

The Department's Community Education Unit completed its Fire Prevention Month activities in the city of Madison's elementary schools this week, after reaching out to more than 8,000 school children with safety and prevention messages.

In that same period of time, city firefighters responded to 31 cooking fires.

Inattentive cooking, and cooking under the influence of drugs or alcohol make up the vast majority of cooking-related fires, firefighters said.

The incident on Gorham involved a resident who fell asleep while boiling a pot of chicken on the stove. Firefighters assisted occupant with ventilation of his apartment. Cooking materials were taken off the stove and put in sink upon arrival.

Dane County Food Council Announces New Coaltion

Dane County Food Council Announces New Coaltion

The Dane County Food Council aims to create an economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable local food system. At their celebration of National Food Day on Oct. 24, the council released an action plan to do just that.

Chair of the council, County Supervisor Melissa Sargent, welcomed the National Food Day crowd to Goodman Community Center. The audience included representatives from Sustainable Times, Community Action Coalition, Family Farm Defenders and Farm Fresh for All.

"We have a lot to celebrate," Sargent said. "Our farmers markets, community supported agriculture (CSA), our community gardens, and locally sourced foods in our grocery stores."

New Kitchen Gallery location increases store’s space and visibility

New Kitchen Gallery location increases store’s space and visibility

The Kitchen Gallery, once nestled into the 1200 block of Williamson St., relocated this month. The more prominent space on King St. includes room for cooking classes, and was acquired with a 24-hour fundraising feat.

"We wanted to stay as close to the near east side as possible, but we needed more visibility," store manager Stephanie Kessenich said. "Being this close to the farmer’s market is a big plus."

Beth Crawford, long time near east side resident, came to the new King St. location on Saturday, looking for Middle Eastern cookie molds. She was sad to see the store move, but realized the more visible location and larger space was necessary.

"The new store is beautiful," she said.