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Ranking: Madison No. 8 healthiest city in U.S.

Ranking: Madison No. 8 healthiest city in U.S.

The Huffington Post has named Madison one of the country's 25 healthiest cities, according to a release.

Madison was named No. 8 behind San Francisco, Fargo, San Diego, Anaheim, Minneapolis, Salt Lake City and San Jose.

The rankings looked at disease incidence, depression measures, unemployment rates and FBI crime statistics to determine the country's healthiest cities.

According to the release, Madison had the highest scores in low crime rates and affordable fresh produce. The city also has the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum, which includes prairies, savannas and 20 miles of trails.

Madison was the No. 1 pick for city life with more than 120 distinct neighborhood associations, according to the release. Civic involvement was also listed as a factor with opportunities to get involved in the university community or with capital-city politics.

Madison Marathon sold out; half-marathon has openings

Madison Marathon sold out; half-marathon has openings

Madison Marathon organizers announced Thursday the full marathon has sold out but there are still openings in the Madison half-marathon.

The 18th running of the road race is being held Nov. 10, according to a release. Anyone over the age of 14 can register online until Nov. 9 if space is available.

The marathon is organized by Madison Festivals, which took over the race in 2001 and uses the event to raise money for the Badger Honor Flight, YMCA, My Team Triumph and 40 area nonprofits that provide volunteers for the event, water stations and course, officials said.

The fall half-marathon will be held in honor of veterans, according to the release.

Ironman Wisconsin brings out athletes with disabilties

Ironman Wisconsin brings out athletes with disabilties

Thousands of athletes came to Madison's streets and lakes on Sunday for the annual Ironman Wisconsin competition.

The grueling day starts with a 2.4 mile swim followed by a 112-mile bike ride, and of course, a marathon.

Athletes of all backgrounds imaginable competed, including a special pair that crossed the finish line together this year.

The Pease brothers, Brent and Kyle, were out on Sunday morning among the sea of swim caps ready to lap Lake Monona.

Though they were two of many, they were easier to spot than most: In a current made choppy by the freestyles of 2,500 swimmers, Kyle, who has cerebral palsy, was out of his chair and racing in a kayak with brother Brent as his personal tug boat.

Now fast-forward four hours to mile 45 of the bike route.

That's where you'd find Brent, pedaling enough to push both Pease brothers

But this story isn't just about any of the bikers or the runners rounding the corner of Dayton and Henry streets.

Brothers don't let wheelchair stop them from competing together as triathletes

Brothers don't let wheelchair stop them from competing together as triathletes

A pair of unique competitors is in Madison this weekend to run, bike and swim in the annual Ironman Wisconsin triathlon.

Brothers Kyle and Brent Pease have traveled to Wisconsin from Atlanta to take on the Ironman and inspire the disabled community. .

To raise funds for the Kyle Pease Foundation, which supports people with disabilities participating in sports, the Pease brothers compete in the triathlon as an assisted-athlete team.

Kyle Pease suffers from cerebral palsy and is confined to a wheelchair. But despite that limitation, the brothers have competed in multiple athletic races throughout the nation, which will include the Ironman Wisconsin after this Sunday.

Kyle Pease said the message of the foundation is to help others and emphasize an individual's unique talents.

UW police report 'extreme' intoxication levels

UW police report 'extreme' intoxication levels

University of Wisconsin-Madison police are dealing with high levels of intoxication since the return of students to campus, according to a release.

Officials said since last Tuesday UW-Madison police have issued 25 underage alcohol citations and have been involved in 10 incidents where students were transported to a detox facility.

Police took 19-year-old female student to detox who was found stumbling around Camp Randall Stadium just before Saturday's game with a blood-alcohol content of 0.33 percent, according to the release.

Officials said another female student was transported to detox after police found her passed out near Smith Greenhouse on campus with a blood-alcohol content of 0.37 percent.

"These are extremely high levels of intoxication and incapacitation," UWPD Chief Susan Riseling said in the release. "It's very possible that in the 0.37 case, if no one called for help, this student may have died."

Local healthcare group lauded for leadership, ethics practices

A company that operates several area hospitals received state recognition.

SSM Health Care of Wisconsin announced in July it will be given the Wisconsin Forward Award of Excellence, the highest level of the Forward Awards, the group said.

Wisconsin Forward Award, a state organization, will honor award recipients at a ceremony and reception sometime this fall, SSM said in a news release.

The health care company was given the award of excellence for demonstrating best practices, "visionary" leadership and a focus on results, according to a Forward Award statement. .

SSM Health Care owns St. Mary’s Hospital and St. Mary’s Care Center in Madison, St. Clare Hospital and St. Clare Meadows Care Center in Baraboo and St. Mary’s Janesville Hospital.

Workout with purpose: Badger football team gives back

Workout with purpose: Badger football team gives back

The Badger Football team spent Tuesday afternoon doing what they usually do--lifting weights. But this work out had a bit more purpose.

One lift at a time, Badger linebacker Chris Borland and his teammates are making a difference for 14-year old Darien Moran.

"We have raised almost $1,000 in just a short span of time; it speaks volumes about the guys we have on our team," said Borland.

In partnership with the program "Uplifting Athletes," the Badger football team is raising money and awareness for rare diseases, including Moran's autoimmune disease, by lifting weights Tuesday. Moran had a disease called Lagerhans Cell Histiocytosis X.

"It causes tumors to reappear all over my body at any given time," Moran said about his disease.

"It's the first step in our 'Uplifting Athletes'; it's our first 'Lift for Life'. I hope it's something that grows bigger here at Wisconsin," said Borland.