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City warns residents to take precautions in bitter cold

City warns residents to take precautions in bitter cold

Amid forecasts of extreme cold in the next few days, the city of Madison said residents should take precautions to stay safe and be vigilant for the well-being of others. 

News 3 Chief Meteorologist Gary Cannalte said low temperatures Thursday will fall into the teens below zero with wind chills as cold as minus 30. Wind chill advisories go into effect Thursday evening and continue through Friday morning.

Friday will be partly sunny and windy with high temperatures in the mid-teens and wind chills as cold as minus 15.

The city suggested several precautions residents should take during the extreme cold, including:

Scope of hunger in Dane County is getting worse

Scope of hunger in Dane County is getting worse

Vincent Washington took his place in line outside of the Bread of Life Food Pantry. It's certainly not his first time at St. Paul's. He and his wife used to volunteer there, until the temp jobs ran out, along with the food in his kitchen.

Now unemployed, Washington said coming to the pantry once a month is about survival.

"Without it, what are you going to do? Go out there and steal and rob, and then where would you be?" Washington said.

Teriann Strassi will also have Thanksgiving dinner thanks to Bread of Life. She started coming in 2010 after her job was shipped overseas and her unemployment benefits ran out.

A mother of three, Strassi is working toward her paralegal degree. Since her husband works full time, the family doesn't qualify for food stamps or other government help when it comes to food.

"There have been plenty of tears. Plenty of days when I feel like I can't make it," Strassi said. "Tomorrow's always better."

St. Mary's receives accolade for care

St. Mary’s Hospital was named one of the nation's 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals in a study that focuses on care. It was the only hospital in the state of Wisconsin to receive the award from Truven Health Analytics.

The Truven Health 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals study evaluated performance in areas like risk-adjusted mortality, complications, process of care and 30-day readmission rates. This is the 15th year of the study.

The winning hospitals were announced in the Nov. 4 edition of "Modern Healthcare" magazine.

Real Food Week takes over Madison's campus to promote better food sourcing

Real Food Week takes over Madison's campus to promote better food sourcing

Foodies rejoice, Food Day 2013 is here. On Thursday, Americans across the country united to celebrate the grassroots movement for sustainable food and education. UW-Madison embraced the national celebration by hosting the first Real Food Week from Oct. 21-25 with the ultimate goal of improving the sourcing of food on campus, according to Slow Food UW.

The week consisted of on-campus lectures, panel discussions and other food-related events to discuss the benefits of eating real food and raise community awareness. As defined by Slow Food UW, the four criteria for real food are local and community-based, fair, ecologically sound and humane.

The first Real Food Week event took place on Oct. 21 at 6:30 p.m. at The Crossing where Slow Food UW hosted a special Family Dinner Night, designed by Executive Chef of Weary Traveler Free House Joey Dunscombe, and panel discussion. 

Public Health: Assistance available for Marketplace sign-up

Public Health: Assistance available for Marketplace sign-up

Public Health of Madison and Dane County would like to remind residents of assistance programs that are available when signing up for health coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace.

Residents can ask questions or sign up for coverage by going to the website or calling 1-800-318-2596 and talking to a Marketplace representative, according to a release. Both options lead residents through a step-by-step process, but until the website is running more smoothly, calling a Marketplace representative is the best option.

Below is the information needed to sign up:

Clinic offers healthy alternatives to Halloween sugar rush

Clinic offers healthy alternatives to Halloween sugar rush

A health care facility is offering tips to reduce the sugar intake that accompanies the Halloween festivities.

Krista Kohls, a dietitian at the Meriter Clinic downtown on West Washington Avenue, said there are multiple ways parents can make Halloween healthy.

“I’m always a proponent of fruits and vegetables,” Kohls said. “Anytime you can include fruits or vegetables into the snacks or party favors, it’s going to be a good thing to add fiber and vitamins and minerals.”

Kohls said one way to make Halloween partiers  young or old more healthy is a new twist on a veggie tray. She suggested arranging veggies to resemble a Jack-o’-Lantern using baby carrots, cucumber and broccoli on a circular tray with three dipping cups of hummus.

Snuggle House continues to face obstacles before opening

Snuggle House continues to face obstacles before opening

Madison's first and only snuggling business faces another hurdle before opening its doors. In fact, it could be an issue that prevents the Snuggle House from opening at all.

Assistant City Attorney Jennifer Zilavy and Madison Police Lt. David McCaw walked through the Snuggle House facility Tuesday afternoon, specifically looking for safety concerns.

The Snuggle House was pitched to the city as a place where people could schedule an allotted amount of private time with a professional snuggler. In that time, the client can converse with the employee and cuddle.

Three female snugglers and one male snuggler have already been hired.

Zilavy said the business needs to submit proof of insurance before the city can move forward with licenses, permits and the certificate of occupancy. Once Snuggle House obtains insurance, Zilavy said it would be allowed to open.