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One last visit, last lasagna at Gino's

One last visit, last lasagna at Gino's

Gino Gargano first announced he was closing his long-time restaurant after 50 years of business on State Street in September.

Thursday is Gino's last day at the Italian eatery. News 3 made one last visit to 540 State St. to chat with the 73-year-old restauranteur on closing the doors of his business locally famous for its stuffed pizzas and lasagna.

Watch News 3 Traveler report on Gino's retirement:

Real Food Week takes over Madison's campus to promote better food sourcing

Real Food Week takes over Madison's campus to promote better food sourcing

Foodies rejoice, Food Day 2013 is here. On Thursday, Americans across the country united to celebrate the grassroots movement for sustainable food and education. UW-Madison embraced the national celebration by hosting the first Real Food Week from Oct. 21-25 with the ultimate goal of improving the sourcing of food on campus, according to Slow Food UW.

The week consisted of on-campus lectures, panel discussions and other food-related events to discuss the benefits of eating real food and raise community awareness. As defined by Slow Food UW, the four criteria for real food are local and community-based, fair, ecologically sound and humane.

The first Real Food Week event took place on Oct. 21 at 6:30 p.m. at The Crossing where Slow Food UW hosted a special Family Dinner Night, designed by Executive Chef of Weary Traveler Free House Joey Dunscombe, and panel discussion. 

Dozens watch anti-bullying film at library

More than 40 people showed up to watch the documentary "Bully" downtown at the Madison Central Library on West Mifflin Street Wednesday.

"Bully" is a powerful and provocative film that follows the lives of five kids who are bullied every day. Its message is that the culture of our schools is broken and needs to change.

The film resonated with many viewers, bringing some close to tears, who discussed the film after the 6:30 p.m. showing. The dialogue was moderated by News 3 Anchor Susan Siman as part of WISC-TV's year-long "Time for Kids Buddy Project" to fight bullying.

Eleven-year-old Terriana Brown said the movie hit close to home for her.  

""I might cry right now," Brown said. "It feels like it's me that is on the screen."

Police expect calm Freakfest this year

Police expect calm Freakfest this year

Madison police said they expect a relatively calm Freakfest this year.

State Street will be filled with all sorts of characters this Saturday as the Halloween celebration continues in downtown Madison.

Police said the number of arrests at Freakfest have gone down, and they are projecting a cost savings this year.

Streets, mainly Gorhman and Johnson, will close at 4:45 p.m. Saturday and will reopen at 2 a.m. Sunday morning.

Advisories on eating fish from local lakes may not be reaching all

Advisories on eating fish from local lakes may not be reaching all

Fish from Madison’s lakes contain contaminants that can pose adverse health effects to people who consume them. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has issued recommendations suggesting that people limit their consumption of fish caught in the lakes.

Yet those advisories may not be reaching everyone, especially low-income people and minority groups, who are more likely to eat fish from the city’s lakes. Moreover, programs to spread the word about the hazards have been limited or cut in response to limited resources.

“Given the hard economic times, I suspect more people than ever are fishing for food -- predominantly lower income and minority (people),” said Maria C. Powell, an environmental scientist and president of the advocacy group, Midwest Environmental Justice Organization. A recent rise in consumption may be leading to disparities in contaminant exposure, which can have long-term health consequences.

Award-winning journalist is first WUD lecture speaker of year

Award-winning journalist is first WUD lecture speaker of year

The first speaker of the Wisconsin Union Directorate Distinguished Lecture Series this year is award-winning journalist Michele Norris, according to a release.

Norris will be speaking Monday in Varsity Hall at Union South at 7:30 p.m., according to the release. Tickets are not required to attend the free event.

Norris has more than two decades of experience and is currently a host and special correspondent for National Public Radio, organizers said. Previously, she served as co-host for NPR’s All Things Considered, public radio’s longest-running national program, with Robert Siegel and Melissa Block. Norris hosted from 2002 to 2012.

She released her first book, “The Grace of Silence: A Memoir,” in September 2013, according to the release. It focused on how America talks about race in the wake of Barack Obama’s presidential election and explores her own family’s racial legacy.

Festival brings activities, crafts to Elver Park neighborhood

Festival brings activities, crafts to Elver Park neighborhood

Madison Parks is hosting the second annual Fall Festival Craft Fair Saturday from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Elver Park.

The free arts and crafts show will be held rain or shine at the park on McKenna Boulevard, according to a release.

"Last year Madison Parks introduced an arts and crafts show to our Fall Festival, and it was a big hit," Parks Superintendent Kevin Briski said in the release. "We are really excited to bring the Fall Festival Craft Fair back this year with talented crafters, food, music and fun activities for families."

The festival will have local artists, crafters, food vendors and live music by the Dang-Its, according to the release. Artists and crafters will be selling original, handmade pieces like pottery, jewelry, quilts, paintings and other decorative pieces.